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One-on-One with Miss 676, Neti Taumoepeau

Music 18 May 2011   »   by TheWhatItDo
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The WhatItDo has been providing exclusive interviews on some of the hottest Polynesian men and women in the music business right now. We caught up with R&B/Reggae singer Neti Taumoepeau a.k.a Miss 676! Showing that it is possible to create mainstream music while staying true to your roots, this Tongan beauty from Utah shares experiences from her musical journey so far and what to expect from her new album.

TWID: What role did music play in your life growing up?

NT: Music was definitely a part of my life; my mother was always singing, my father played the guitar, and my older siblings were into music too.  When I was five years old, my older brothers and sister made a band with a few of their friends from church and school. The band played R&B, Soul, and mainstream Pop music. I was always there watching them practice and perform so that’s where I got exposed to those genres. I grew up listening to that kind of music even before Reggae.

TWID: How were the first few years in the music industry and the musical process?

NT: After high school, I joined the group Small Axe and that was my first time ever recording music. It wasn’t until 2005 that I really started doing my own thing. I always wrote poems in high school but it wasn’t until 2005 that I finally put my poems into songs.

My dad always pushed us into pursuing music. In 2001, my brother, Duke “Tonga Kid” Taumoepeau, started making his own music and started traveling to NYC working on his own music. Duke was definitely a strong support in my career – he’s helped me to record, produce, mix, and master all of my music. It’s such a blessing in my life because these things [studio time] do not come cheap. He and I have come to work on a sound that’s my own. He is now my main producer. While growing up with R&B and Soul music, I also came to love Reggae music and I’ve found a balance of the two that fits me.

The first album, “Moving On”, definitely connected to our generation here in the states. I wrote all twelve songs that were on the album. It was a great experience because I learned the basics [recording process, music industry]. I took a break and then came back in 2008 with my Tongan album.

TWID: How did this Tongan album come to be?

NT: The idea to do a Tongan album came from various events that were going on in Tonga at the time. I wanted to give back to my culture, my heritage. I sat down and talked with my sister Lavinia and with ‘Anapesi Ka’ili about how I was going to go about doing that. So I decided that 100% of the proceeds from my Tongan album would go to the Tonga Red Cross Society. I wanted to keep this album very traditional and true to the original compositions. I learned to appreciate the Tongan music just for its rawness and the harmonies.

Miss 676

TWID: What are your goals for this new album and what can we expect?

NT: My goal for this album is just to get my music out there to the public. I want them to know who I am and to recognize my voice, my sound. I have a few featured artists on my album such as Alo Key but I’ve also been working with different songwriters and producers. I have a song written for me by Fatai [Tavo] Nau and producers Goof “Fambillion” Saffings and Filipe Motulalo are on board to help me as well. I’m also incorporating a lot of live music and instruments.


TWID: What are some of the biggest lessons you’ve learned thus far?

NT: I’ve had to learn who I am as an artist, knowing what I’m capable of, and being okay with the things that I can’t change. As a singer, I’m a contralto – my voice is lower. I’m not a soprano. There are things that a soprano can sing that I can’t sing. Overall, I can’t regret it. Just move along. I have come to recognize my strengths and build upon them.

What wise words from such a strong Polynesian woman! Neti’s voice and sound is her own with its smooth yet rich tones. We can’t wait for this new album, which is anticipated to release by the end of this summer. Until then, check out her first two albums on iTunes and CD Baby and get the latest news and updates on her Facebook page.

 

Article Written By: Pesi Kava

**Photos and music courtesy of Neti Taumoepeau

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1769213775 Aggie Boo

    Reading this article has made me think about the things i want to pursue in life. Thanks for the inspiration Neti (= Your awesome! #LoveAggieBoo

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1769213775 Aggie Boo

    Reading this article has made me think about the things i want to pursue in life. Thanks for the inspiration Neti (= Your awesome! #LoveAggieBoo

  • Neti

    Aggie Boo, thanks so much for the support!! You all are doing awesome work and whatever it is you want to pursue in life DO IT!! :) Langi kuo tau! Nothing but love!! 

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  • Mele Tuita

    Keep pushing sis! Best wishes to more music blessings your way <3 xoxo  

  • DinahJane

    Neti is one of my favorite female artists!!! I hope i can be like you when I grow up

  • Neti

    That’s suuch a compliment Dinah! HONESTLY!! You’re such a talented young lady and I’m not surprised you’re as talented as you are! I remember singing with your Mom and she has a beautiful voice! The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. Stay grounded sweetheart, never compromise your values or what you believe in for anything and most of all don’t ever give up on your dreams! Be true to who you are on AND off the stage and no one will be able to deny what a strong young woman you are. Stay humble and continue to develop your craft. You are definitely a force to be reckoned with! ;) ‘Ofa lahi atu sweetheart! Send my love to your Mom! xoxo

  • Jdice

    Cum to NZ!! :) lol

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